Great love Brizzle

https://kwmc.org.uk/childreninneed2018/

Young filmmakers from Bristol have worked with Knowle West Media Centre’s creative agency Eight to produce three films about projects in the South West that are supported by Children in Need (CiN).

Eight supported a group of young people from Bristol to produce and direct the ‘where the money went’ films for BBC Points West, hiring young people from KWMC and partners Off the Record and Creative Youth Network as apprentices to work on the production.

In October 2018 the young people chose the three projects they wanted to visit to capture their stories: Alliance Homes, Jamie’s Farm and National Star. They conducted broadcast interviews with staff, volunteers and people supported by the projects, shooting and editing the films with support from Eight’s experienced filmmakers. The young people also co-produced original soundtracks for the films, working with music producers from KWMC.

In November 2018 the films were broadcast on BBC Points West on three consecutive evenings. You can watch the films by following the links below:

Alliance Homes
Jamie’s Farm
National Star

Check out the behind the scenes footage where the filmmakers are interviewed about their experiences too.

Some of the filmmakers attended the live Children in Need broadcast on 16 November 2018 at the Bottleyard Studios in South Bristol, where filmmaker Donnell Asare and Mena Fombo, KWMC’s Young People’s Programme Manager, were interviewed on air.

Liam McKinnon at Off The Record commented: “We were super-excited to be involved in this filming project with BBC Children in Need. Off The Record is all about empowering young people so it was fantastic to see that a real emphasis was placed on giving young people the opportunity to create and film their own piece, in their own words. The young people from our Zazi project really enjoyed the experience.”

About the partners

KWMC’s programme for young people – Jump Studios – is supported by BBC Children in Need and offers a range of creative activities, training, coaching and support for young people aged 10+ to develop their skills, networks and confidence.  Our creative agency, Eight, provides a range of creative services for clients ranging from web design to filming and editing. Eight’s traineeship scheme enables junior creatives to learn and earn as they undertake these commissions with the support of experienced mentors.

Off the Record (OTR) is a mental health social movement by and for young people aged 11-25 in Bristol and South Gloucestershire. Project Zazi is the name for OTR’s work with Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) young people tackling issues of inequality, discrimination, oppression, culture and identity, promoting good physical and mental health, healthy relationships and positive lifestyles.

Creative Youth Network works to help young people remove or overcome the barriers they face by:

– Building trusting relationships with young people that enable us to address their individual needs
– Advocating for young people to influence policy and get young voices heard
– Providing a wide range of programmes and activities to help young people reach their potential

The post Young filmmakers showcase local Children in Need projects appeared first on KWMC.

who else Bristol is a fantastic place to live ?

https://secretldn.com/map-london-medieval-murders/

Evil deeds and dastardly doings are the stars of this medieval murder map.

If you delve back into London’s murky past, you’ll find all manner of dark deeds. Even so, the Medieval Murder Map that’s been released by the University of Cambridge’s Violence Research Centre is pretty grim reading. Charting the grisly killings that happened within the City of London in medieval times, the map is a fascinating, albeit gruesome, peek into the capital’s past.

Medieval
[Violence Research Centre]

By far the most interesting parts of the map are the brief descriptions given to each individual death. You’ve got unexpected murderers, as seen in the tag marked ‘Hampshire clergyman murders retired soldier on their way to visit bishop‘. There’s conflict between different professions, as with ‘A deadly fight between members of the fishmonger and the skinner guilds‘. Even more perplexing are the murders of those who deserved, at best, a slap on the wrist – witness ‘Vicious attack for dropping eel skins outside a shop‘.

Easily my favourites, however, are those murders where the researchers have decided to sharpen their comedic chops with a good pun. ‘Cripplegate cobbler boots city messenger into eternity‘ is a surprisingly literary description, but it pales in comparison next to the witty ‘Welsh tailor kills Irish Will and goes Scot free‘. Ah, the whimsy! It’s almost enough to make you forget that these are brutal murders, isn’t it?

Medieval
The murder weapons of choice in medieval London – seriously, if anyone came at me with one of these, I’d probably just die of fright. [Violence Research Centre]

In consulting the map, you’ll learn that between 1300 and 1340, there were 142 murders in the City of London. If you think this seems pretty high, you’d be right. Indeed, the map’s creators calculate that, adjusting for population size, this would equal a murder rate of roughly 20 homicides per 100,000 – a rate roughly equal to that of modern-day Philadelphia.

As for how the people were committing these dark deeds, the researchers have helpfully outlined the weapons used, including axes, knives, a bow, and even something called an ‘Irish knife’. A look through the historical background section of the map is highly encouraged for those of a macabre disposition – it’ll tell you on which day the murders were committed, and which body part received the fatal blow. It’s pretty fascinating stuff, and you can see the full map here.

For more macabre map musings, check out this cartographic look at London’s dark past.

The post This Gruesome Map Of London Charts All The City’s Medieval Murders appeared first on Secret London.

Who else loves

https://secretldn.com/map-london-medieval-murders/

Evil deeds and dastardly doings are the stars of this medieval murder map.

If you delve back into London’s murky past, you’ll find all manner of dark deeds. Even so, the Medieval Murder Map that’s been released by the University of Cambridge’s Violence Research Centre is pretty grim reading. Charting the grisly killings that happened within the City of London in medieval times, the map is a fascinating, albeit gruesome, peek into the capital’s past.

Medieval
[Violence Research Centre]

By far the most interesting parts of the map are the brief descriptions given to each individual death. You’ve got unexpected murderers, as seen in the tag marked ‘Hampshire clergyman murders retired soldier on their way to visit bishop‘. There’s conflict between different professions, as with ‘A deadly fight between members of the fishmonger and the skinner guilds‘. Even more perplexing are the murders of those who deserved, at best, a slap on the wrist – witness ‘Vicious attack for dropping eel skins outside a shop‘.

Easily my favourites, however, are those murders where the researchers have decided to sharpen their comedic chops with a good pun. ‘Cripplegate cobbler boots city messenger into eternity‘ is a surprisingly literary description, but it pales in comparison next to the witty ‘Welsh tailor kills Irish Will and goes Scot free‘. Ah, the whimsy! It’s almost enough to make you forget that these are brutal murders, isn’t it?

Medieval
The murder weapons of choice in medieval London – seriously, if anyone came at me with one of these, I’d probably just die of fright. [Violence Research Centre]

In consulting the map, you’ll learn that between 1300 and 1340, there were 142 murders in the City of London. If you think this seems pretty high, you’d be right. Indeed, the map’s creators calculate that, adjusting for population size, this would equal a murder rate of roughly 20 homicides per 100,000 – a rate roughly equal to that of modern-day Philadelphia.

As for how the people were committing these dark deeds, the researchers have helpfully outlined the weapons used, including axes, knives, a bow, and even something called an ‘Irish knife’. A look through the historical background section of the map is highly encouraged for those of a macabre disposition – it’ll tell you on which day the murders were committed, and which body part received the fatal blow. It’s pretty fascinating stuff, and you can see the full map here.

For more macabre map musings, check out this cartographic look at London’s dark past.

The post This Gruesome Map Of London Charts All The City’s Medieval Murders appeared first on Secret London.

Tremendous I love our city

http://www.wherethewall.com/bristol-street-artists/

John Doh Confessions of a Street Artist

John Doh started painting in the 1980’s when he was a young kid growing up on the North side of Bristol.
Back then there was no specialised graffiti paint, it was just cellulose car paint, which stunk like hell and was far more difficult to control than the new modern paint. This type of paint was available from the local bike shop.

Influences

Like many of the street artist back then in the 80’s, John was heavily influenced by Hip Hop.
With graffiti being part of that culture, John began to practice his new found love.
At that time John worked under a different name and painted a popular character “Mr Chad” or just “Chad” with the sayings “what no?”. He also painted an upside down dead bird.
Admittedly the characters by his own admission were extremely basic but this was just the start of John’s journey into street art.

Painting Trains

Growing up close to a train coal yard it was only a matter of time before John painted his first coal carriage and it was around these times where John first bumped into well-known Bristol graffiti artist, Inkie.
Inkie told John about a graffiti club on the opposite side of the city, called Barton Hill Youth Club, but never got invited to this close-knit set up and so John Doh missed out on John Nation’s ‘School for vandals’.
As he continued to paint train wagons he had many run-ins with the Transport Police who’s determination in catching young graffiti artists gave them the reputation of being terminators, not stopping until they had tracked down their man.
around this time John had a break from painting, he settled into a long term relationship, got a job and left the street art world behind.

Re-emergence

After the breakdown of his relationship, John returned to the art world with renewed enthusiasm.
With many new life experience’s lived, John wanted to put his views and opinions out into the world, and express himself, but with an added bit of humour.
No longer was he prepared to be the guy sitting in front of the television, ranting. He started to get creative, and paint what he thought most of the general public were thinking but maybe too scared to say.

Present Day

Like most painters John’s art has evolved over the years and is now a mixture of all different mediums.
John is probably better known for his wacky street art installations and stencil work.
John is always looking to break boundries in street art and is always try’s to say something, hopefully brightening up someone’s day, or at least generate a smile.

Influences and style

His influences are the news, politics, anime, manga and the legends of urban art themselves.
It is very important to John Doh that he produces all his work himself. For example with his stencils that means no laser cutting and no eight man crew holding the stencils against the wall for him to spray. John is a lone wolf in the street art world.

John Doe’s work can be found all over the country, his lastest work can be found on the streets of Liverpool, Birmingham and of course Bristol.

Interview by Alex Tamasi.

John Doh’s website is here.
Check out his fun and humourous tshirts that he regularly produces.

The post Bristol Street Art Tours Featuring…. appeared first on WHERE THE WALL.

best our city super fan

https://bristolshoppingquarter.co.uk/christmas-at-the-new-room/

There is a lot happening at the New Room, John Wesley’s Chapel, in Broadmead in the lead up to Christmas, below are the key dates.

Key dates

Saturday 1 December, 10.30am-4pm
New Room Christmas Fayre, with special Curator’s Highlights tour of the New Room museum
With a selection of stalls selling Fairtrade Christmas treats, second-hand books, stocking fillers and independent artisan crafts.
Tours leave from the chapel at 11am, 12noon, 1pm, 2pm and 3pm – £6 per person, including museum entry.

Thursday 13th December – 7.30pm (doors 7pm)
Folk at the New Room presents Sam Sweeney – SOLD OUT
Tickets £16/£12 Conc. (Adv £12/£10 Conc.)
An intimate acoustic performance from Bellowhead violinist Sam Sweeney as he launches his solo album ‘The Unfinished Violin’.

Wednesday 19th December
1pm – Shoppers Carols at the New Room
6pm – Carols by Candlelight at the New Room
Join the New Room’s annual Christmas celebration of traditional Christmas carols in a beautiful candlelit 18th century chapel.

Thursday 20th December – 7.30pm (doors 7pm)
Folk at the New Room presents Three Cane Whale
Tickets £14/£12 Conc. (Adv £12/£10 Conc.)
An atmospheric chamber-folk Christmas special with Bristol-based multi-instrumental acoustic trio Three Cane Whale.

They will also have an Advent calendar up in the Broadmead courtyard like last year – adding a new window every day. If people wish to use the New Room as a quiet space to take a break from the Christmas busyness, then the chapel is a place where all are welcome to come for a time of peace and reflection – open Monday-Saturday 10.30am-4pm.

Cards for Good Causes pop-up shop

Cards for Good Causes is the UK’s largest multi-charity Christmas card organisation. Their popular pop-up shop is open at the New Room from 10.30am-3.30pm Monday to Saturday until Tuesday 18 December. Expect cards, wrapping paper, Advent calendars, small gifts, and more

Christmas and New Year opening hours

The New Room will be closed on 23, 24, 25 and 26 December.
It will be open on December 27, 28 and 29.
(closed 30 December as per usual hours).

It will also closed for New Year on 31 December and 1 January.
It will open again on Wednesday 2nd January.

For further information visit www.newroombristol.org.uk

The post Christmas at the New Room appeared first on Bristol Shopping Quarter.

Always love anything about our city

https://kwmc.org.uk/childreninneed2018/

Young filmmakers from Bristol have worked with Knowle West Media Centre’s creative agency Eight to produce three films about projects in the South West that are supported by Children in Need (CiN).

Eight supported a group of young people from Bristol to produce and direct the ‘where the money went’ films for BBC Points West, hiring young people from KWMC and partners Off the Record and Creative Youth Network as apprentices to work on the production.

In October 2018 the young people chose the three projects they wanted to visit to capture their stories: Alliance Homes, Jamie’s Farm and National Star. They conducted broadcast interviews with staff, volunteers and people supported by the projects, shooting and editing the films with support from Eight’s experienced filmmakers. The young people also co-produced original soundtracks for the films, working with music producers from KWMC.

In November 2018 the films were broadcast on BBC Points West on three consecutive evenings. You can watch the films by following the links below:

Alliance Homes
Jamie’s Farm
National Star

Check out the behind the scenes footage where the filmmakers are interviewed about their experiences too.

Some of the filmmakers attended the live Children in Need broadcast on 16 November 2018 at the Bottleyard Studios in South Bristol, where filmmaker Donnell Asare and Mena Fombo, KWMC’s Young People’s Programme Manager, were interviewed on air.

Liam McKinnon at Off The Record commented: “We were super-excited to be involved in this filming project with BBC Children in Need. Off The Record is all about empowering young people so it was fantastic to see that a real emphasis was placed on giving young people the opportunity to create and film their own piece, in their own words. The young people from our Zazi project really enjoyed the experience.”

About the partners

KWMC’s programme for young people – Jump Studios – is supported by BBC Children in Need and offers a range of creative activities, training, coaching and support for young people aged 10+ to develop their skills, networks and confidence.  Our creative agency, Eight, provides a range of creative services for clients ranging from web design to filming and editing. Eight’s traineeship scheme enables junior creatives to learn and earn as they undertake these commissions with the support of experienced mentors.

Off the Record (OTR) is a mental health social movement by and for young people aged 11-25 in Bristol and South Gloucestershire. Project Zazi is the name for OTR’s work with Black and Minority Ethnic (BME) young people tackling issues of inequality, discrimination, oppression, culture and identity, promoting good physical and mental health, healthy relationships and positive lifestyles.

Creative Youth Network works to help young people remove or overcome the barriers they face by:

– Building trusting relationships with young people that enable us to address their individual needs
– Advocating for young people to influence policy and get young voices heard
– Providing a wide range of programmes and activities to help young people reach their potential

The post Young filmmakers showcase local Children in Need projects appeared first on KWMC.

Nice I really love

http://www.wherethewall.com/bristol-street-artists/

John Doh Confessions of a Street Artist

John Doh started painting in the 1980’s when he was a young kid growing up on the North side of Bristol.
Back then there was no specialised graffiti paint, it was just cellulose car paint, which stunk like hell and was far more difficult to control than the new modern paint. This type of paint was available from the local bike shop.

Influences

Like many of the street artist back then in the 80’s, John was heavily influenced by Hip Hop.
With graffiti being part of that culture, John began to practice his new found love.
At that time John worked under a different name and painted a popular character “Mr Chad” or just “Chad” with the sayings “what no?”. He also painted an upside down dead bird.
Admittedly the characters by his own admission were extremely basic but this was just the start of John’s journey into street art.

Painting Trains

Growing up close to a train coal yard it was only a matter of time before John painted his first coal carriage and it was around these times where John first bumped into well-known Bristol graffiti artist, Inkie.
Inkie told John about a graffiti club on the opposite side of the city, called Barton Hill Youth Club, but never got invited to this close-knit set up and so John Doh missed out on John Nation’s ‘School for vandals’.
As he continued to paint train wagons he had many run-ins with the Transport Police who’s determination in catching young graffiti artists gave them the reputation of being terminators, not stopping until they had tracked down their man.
around this time John had a break from painting, he settled into a long term relationship, got a job and left the street art world behind.

Re-emergence

After the breakdown of his relationship, John returned to the art world with renewed enthusiasm.
With many new life experience’s lived, John wanted to put his views and opinions out into the world, and express himself, but with an added bit of humour.
No longer was he prepared to be the guy sitting in front of the television, ranting. He started to get creative, and paint what he thought most of the general public were thinking but maybe too scared to say.

Present Day

Like most painters John’s art has evolved over the years and is now a mixture of all different mediums.
John is probably better known for his wacky street art installations and stencil work.
John is always looking to break boundries in street art and is always try’s to say something, hopefully brightening up someone’s day, or at least generate a smile.

Influences and style

His influences are the news, politics, anime, manga and the legends of urban art themselves.
It is very important to John Doh that he produces all his work himself. For example with his stencils that means no laser cutting and no eight man crew holding the stencils against the wall for him to spray. John is a lone wolf in the street art world.

John Doe’s work can be found all over the country, his lastest work can be found on the streets of Liverpool, Birmingham and of course Bristol.

Interview by Alex Tamasi.

John Doh’s website is here.
Check out his fun and humourous tshirts that he regularly produces.

The post Bristol Street Art Tours Featuring…. appeared first on WHERE THE WALL.

IMO stuff about our city are fab

https://secretldn.com/victorian-bath-house-cocktail-bar/

Can you guess what the Victorian Bath House used to be?

Those quirky Victorians have a lot to answer for. They left London full of elegant, ornate, and sometimes downright bizarre structures, and modern-day Londoners have taken them to even more unusual places. Witness the Victorian Bath House; in a former life, it was the spot du jour for a relaxing soak. Now, you’re more likely to find the water of life than bathwater here, as the space has been reimagined as a rather upmarket evening spot and cocktail bar.

Victorian Bath House
Photo: @victorianbathhouse

Even judging by the standards of a) the Victorians and b) the City of London, the Victorian Bath House is a gaudy spot. Originally built in 1895, the grand vision of architect G. Harold Elphick was of a Turkish bath house, filled with Arabic motifs and outlandish tiles. Once the playground of City gentlemen, the bath house’s fortunes foundered after the war, when austerity measures made the cost of running it untenable. A sad situation, especially for a spot that survived the Blitz.

Victorian Bath House
Photo: @victorianbathhouse

Fast-forward to this century, and a restoration project undertaken by Russell Sage Studios has restored the bath house to its former glory. The delightfully OTT decor is married to some rather envious features; an old bath has been repurposed as a champagne cooler, and we’re understandably pretty jealous. Amongst the ornate alcoves and low lighting, you’ll find the drinks to be equally high-falutin’.

Victorian Bath House
Photo: @victorianbathhouse

The bar – coyly named By Appointment Only – splits the cocktail menu into sections such as ‘New & Old Fashioned’, ‘Negronish’, and ‘Cups & Collins’, and every cocktail clocks in at a reasonable £10. But where Victorian Bath House gets even more tantalising is their menu of house-infused gins. Flavours range from the enticing – raspberry & mint – to the wildly inventive likes of quince & blue cheese and venison & summer truffle. Yes, venison. They really do have to be seen (and tasted) to be believed, and if you fall for a gin, you can take home a bottle for yourself.

Victorian Bath House
Photo: @lobato_andrea

Before you get a snifter of these unusual libations, you’ll need to actually get inside. The Victorian Bath House is an appointment-only spot, so walking in is entirely out of the question. It’s a case of making a booking inquiry and crossing your fingers, I’m afraid – unless you can stump up the cash to hire it out for a private event. Oh, and I shouldn’t have to do this, but just to remove any doubt – there are no baths here anymore, so please don’t bring your towels…

Location: 7-8 Bishopsgate, EC2M 3TJ. Nearest station is Liverpool Street. See it on Google Maps.
Opening hours: 5pm-midnight (Thu to Sat), all other days are private hire only.
Price: cocktails are all £10.
More information: from their website.

Featured image: @victorianbathhouse

The post The Luxury Cocktail Bar Hiding Inside An Ornate Bath House • Victorian Bath House appeared first on Secret London.

Thanks big fan here

https://www.avonvalleyrailway.org/events/christmas-tree-decorations-presentation/

CELEBRATING CHRISTMAS WITH
Oldland Preschool and Beacon Rise Primary School
Monday 3 December 2018

We’re glad to announce that this year we’ll be celebrating Christmas

In conjunction with Oldland Pre-School, Oldland Common and the return of Beacon Rise Primary School, Kingswood.

Pupils from the 2 schools will be making decorations for our Christmas tree in the Booking Office and under the Buffet Canopy which will be on show to all our visitors over the festive period.

All the decorations made will be entered into a competition to win a family ticket to see Santa on one of the railway’s Christmas trains this year.  Santa Claus himself and Trust Chairman will be taking time out of their busy schedules to judge the decorations and present prizes on Monday 3rd December from 5pm.  There will also be opportunities for the children to have their photo taken with Santa and our station Buffet will be open for hot drinks.

Beacon Primary School 2017

Santa Award Evening Poster

Oldland Pre-School

Old Pre-School Classes

Beacon Rise Primary School

Santa’s Visits

Buy Santa Special Tickets

The post Celebrating 2018 Christmas With appeared first on Avon Valley Railway.